Posts Categorized: Nutrition

December Newsletter Now Available

Our latest Newsletter is now out. Among the news, updates, and research you’ll read about:

  • Our latest autism research
  • How we’re using two generous grants to help the Cullman Center grow
  • An exciting new article from our friend Dr. Rhonda Patrick
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Exciting updates on Moringa (the Drumstick Tree)

The Cullman Chemoprotection Center at Johns Hopkins University, in a long-term partnership with an international team led from Mexico (Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico and the International Moringa Germplasm Collection), has collaborated to publish a pair of studies in the … Read More

More Public Interest in Sulforaphane

We have been pleasantly surprised to see a series of very understandable, and well documented videos appear recently.  They are unsolicited, and we have no connection to the narrator or his organization, nor were we interviewed for them.  They do … Read More

An update on links between obesity and cancer

Diet and Cancer: Yet Another Connection

Incidence of obesity has reached an all-time high in the United States and continues to rise. In addition to the well known dangers of obesity—hypertension, heart disease, high cholesterol—obesity changes the body on the … Read More

The Cullman Center Weighs in on Moringa Leaf Protein

Moringa oleifera is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree cultivated across the lowland dry tropics worldwide for its nutritious leaves. Despite its nutritious reputation, there has been no systematic survey of the variation in leaf nutritional quality across M. oleifera grown worldwide, or of the other species of the genus. These findings identify clear priorities and limitations for improved moringa varieties with traits such as high protein, calcium, or ease of preparation.

A Matter of Taste

The ability to detect bitterness probably evolved to help us avoid eating harmful substances. By shunning too many bitter substances, especially those present in healthful foods, we might be putting our long-term health at risk. For example, the glucosinolates in Brussels sprouts and its cousins, broccoli, kale, and other cruciferous vegetables, switch on many healthful processes in our bodies, and many medicines prevent or treat serious illness.

. . . wheatgrass is not a superfood

The Center’s Dr. Fahey was recently quoted in an article in Modern Farmer that attempts to dethrone wheatgrass as a miracle-food or super-food.  Says he: “I am unaware of any credible scientific evidence that consuming wheatgrass or wheatgrass juice is … Read More