Posts Categorized: Phytochemistry

The Cullman Center Weighs in on Moringa Leaf Protein

Moringa oleifera is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree cultivated across the lowland dry tropics worldwide for its nutritious leaves. Despite its nutritious reputation, there has been no systematic survey of the variation in leaf nutritional quality across M. oleifera grown worldwide, or of the other species of the genus. These findings identify clear priorities and limitations for improved moringa varieties with traits such as high protein, calcium, or ease of preparation.

The New Yorker highlights our work with the Moringa tree

On June 27 2016, The New Yorker magazine published an article that discusses research we are doing with a collaborator in Mexico on the tropical Moringa tree: Meet the Moringa Tree, An Overqualified, Underachieving Superfood Moringa oleifera, the most commonly farmed species, produces edible leaves that are unusually rich in protein, iron, calcium, nine essential… Read more »

Is the vitamin and phytochemical content of fruit declining?

Graduate student Eleanore Alexander, and the Chemoprotection Center’s Dr. Fahey recently were invited to prepare a commentary on current fruit breeding practices. In it, they suggest that “To reverse the trend of decreasing vitamin and phytochemical content, consumers must demand fruits and vegetables that come from farms using better practices that result in higher nutrient… Read more »

A Matter of Taste

The ability to detect bitterness probably evolved to help us avoid eating harmful substances. By shunning too many bitter substances, especially those present in healthful foods, we might be putting our long-term health at risk. For example, the glucosinolates in Brussels sprouts and its cousins, broccoli, kale, and other cruciferous vegetables, switch on many healthful processes in our bodies, and many medicines prevent or treat serious illness.

. . . wheatgrass is not a superfood

The Center’s Dr. Fahey was recently quoted in an article in Modern Farmer that attempts to dethrone wheatgrass as a miracle-food or super-food.  Says he: “I am unaware of any credible scientific evidence that consuming wheatgrass or wheatgrass juice is any better or worse for one than consuming similar amounts of other green leafy vegetables.”

Will Progeria respond to phytochemicals like sulforaphane?

We recently received a small grant from the Progeria Research Foundation to study Progeria (Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome), which is a devastating inherited disease.  The disease is genetic in that it is caused by a mutation(s) that was identified in the early 1990s by the [now] director of the NIH.  However, there is hope that certain… Read more »

Press Coverage on China Study

chinese-smog-city

Our recent study has been mentioned in the press this week: In The Wall Street Journal‘s How Eating Broccoli Can Help Your Body Cope with Air Pollution, Te-Ping Chen explains: According to a study published this week by the journal Cancer Prevention Research, an experiment conducted in eastern China’s Jiangsu province found that feeding villagers beverages concocted from broccoli… Read more »