Posts Categorized: Moringa

“Indirect Antioxidant” Defined

Over the years many people have asked what we mean when we call sulforaphane an “indirect antioxidant”.  We have just posted a FAQ entry that we hope helps to answer that question.  Here is our answer: Q:  You and others frequently call sulforaphane an indirect antioxidant.  What does that mean? A:  Oxidative stress is thought to be… Read more »

Release of new Webinar and Podcast on Isothiocyanates, Nrf2, Moringa & Sulforaphane Supplementation

Jed Fahey, Sc.D. on Isothiocyanates, the Nrf2 Pathway, Moringa & Sulforaphane Supplementation Released Jan 06, 2017 Preview YouTube video Jed Fahey, Sc.D. on Isothiocyanates, the Nrf2 Pathway, Moringa & Sulforaphane Supplementation Watch the Webinar or Listen to the Podcast  (available via FoundMyFitness.com on iTunes and Sticher)

Follow-up on the webinar/podcast with new FAQ page on this website

In response to the many questions we’ve received as follow-up to Dr. Fahey’s interview with Rhonda Patrick (FoundMyFitness.com), we have added a page with FAQs to this website, that we hope will answer some of the more commonly asked questions.  At the moment, the volume of questions coming in from this website, Twitter and Facebook is… Read more »

Chemoprotection Center’s work on Moringa featured

The Chemoprotection Center was featured in an article about Moringa, in the Johns Hopkins Magazine (The Hub).  Their work on Moringa and the concept of “superfoods” are discussed.  Dr. Fahey is quoted as saying, “Those who could benefit most from its use are in the poorer regions of the dryland tropics where it’s actually grown, …. Read more »

The Cullman Center Weighs in on Moringa Leaf Protein

Moringa oleifera is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree cultivated across the lowland dry tropics worldwide for its nutritious leaves. Despite its nutritious reputation, there has been no systematic survey of the variation in leaf nutritional quality across M. oleifera grown worldwide, or of the other species of the genus. These findings identify clear priorities and limitations for improved moringa varieties with traits such as high protein, calcium, or ease of preparation.

The New Yorker highlights our work with the Moringa tree

On June 27 2016, The New Yorker magazine published an article that discusses research we are doing with a collaborator in Mexico on the tropical Moringa tree: Meet the Moringa Tree, An Overqualified, Underachieving Superfood Moringa oleifera, the most commonly farmed species, produces edible leaves that are unusually rich in protein, iron, calcium, nine essential… Read more »

Moringa health and economic benefits

Rachel Cernasky’s article looks at “superfood” fads and asks whether they can have benefits, especially to the people who live where they are being produced.

Moringa, with its nutrient and nutraceutical profile, might be such a novel plant. And it’s possible that its sale to rich countries may provide a useful cash supplement to tropical communities where it is grown.

Cernasky interviewed me for the article, and she reproduces my rule of thumb for the validity of a moringa product: the closer it is to real, fresh, unadulterated, unprocessed moringa leaves, the better.